3 Amapiano Artists Who Are Conquering The Diaspora

3 Amapiano Artists Who Are Conquering The Diaspora. South African sub-genre called amapiano emerged in contemporary pop culture across other African countries and some parts of the world. Despite its South African origin, African artists, DJs, and producers have joined in the biggest musical movement of amapiano while conquering their dispora.

Here are 3 amapiano artists who are conquering the dispora:

Niniola

Niniola Apata, known professionally as Niniola, is a Nigerian singer and songwriter. Niniola continues to tap the South African phenomenon in tracks like “Addicted, Look Like Me”, “Oh Sharp” featuring Busiswa. Niniola is renowned for effectively wielding South African elements to deliver impressive records since the virality of Maradona. Her recent appearance is featured on Falz’s remix of his hit single “Squander” featuring South Africa’s Kamo Mphela, Mpura, and SayFar.

Sha Sha

Sha Sha is a Zimbabwean singer and songwriter from Mutare, the most populous city in the province of Manicaland, and the third most populous city in Zimbabwe. She has earned the ‘Queen of Amapiano‘ name and is now the poster child of the biggest musical movement in southern Africa. She has collaborated with the leading producers and pioneers of the genre like DJ Maphorisa, Kabza De Small and MFR Souls. It is a fairy tale for the South Africa-based Zimbabwean singer so far, and it looks like things won’t be slowing down anytime soon.

Tresor

Congolese-born Tresor and currently residing in South Africa has made a name for himself in the music industry and now venturing into amapiano, the star has sure worked on a joint album venture to grow the amapiano sound across Africa. His recent appearance is about fusing the incredible South African rhythm of amapiano with Swahili, French, Congolese sounds and melodies. Speaking on working on an amapiano album, Tresor said: “This particular album is special for me because it represents a bold statement of pride in the diversity of our culture as Africans, embracing the rich musical landscape of our home.”

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